COVID-19 | Taking it Online: Jury Research in the Age of COVID-19
Learn More
Checklists

Demonstrative Lists/Comparative Lists/Checklists

May 4, 2021
David C. Bartholomew
David Bartholomew, ThemeVision Focus, ThemeVision Graphics
Themevision Focus

May 2021

Lists of evidence are often persuasive in the courtroom, but can also be difficult for decision-makers to remember.

A Demonstrative Checklist is a great way to summarize lists of items/criteria/requisites and at the same time make those lists vivid and memorable. Use checklists to engage the audience with your case facts. A checklist can be used to equip the jury/audience with critical practical knowledge, prioritize that set of action items, and ultimately help them do the mental math.

In her 19th century sonnet entitled “How I Love You, Let Me Count the Ways” poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning demonstrated the effectiveness of checklists to emphasize how much she loved the subject of her most famous poem. Her checklist of “evidence” provided nine ways to demonstrate the depth of her love for her husband. Her sonnet, when put together visually as a checklist, presents overwhelming evidence to support her assertion.

We don’t even need to completely understand the action items to know that, cumulatively, she loved him!

Browning's Checklist
Browning’s Checklist

Whatever your case facts may be, ThemeVision has the experience and visual know-how to help you put together Demonstrative Lists to help your audience understand and organize your case claims.

Demonstrative Checklists Can Show:

  • Features
  • Events
  • Similarities/Differences
  • Required Elements
  • Criteria
  • Summaries

View PDF Version