PhD, MS, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Michigan State University

MJ, Indiana University, Robert H. McKinney School of Law
BA Psychology, University of Illinois

Author, Jury Decision Making: The State of the Science (NYU Press, 2012)

Professor of psychology, IUPUI (1996 - 2018)

Editorial board for Law and Human Behavior (2012-2018)

Member, American Society of Trial Consultants

Member, American Psychology‐Law Society

Dennis J. Devine, PhD, MJ

Consultant, Indianapolis
317-229-3123 | devine@themevision.com
Dennis Devine leverages his extensive background in psychology with his interest in the law and juries to conduct applied research in the service of clients.

He specializes in applying psychological principles, findings, and methods to assess and diagnose client needs; gathering and systematically analyzing relevant data; and then conveying critical findings in an easy-to-digest manner.

Prior to joining ThemeVision, Dr. Devine was an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) for 22 years, where he conducted research and taught courses in statistics, psychological measurement and data interpretation, and psychology and law. His primary research interest was jury decision making, with a focus on learning when juries will be influenced by extralegal factors and how the deliberation process influences verdicts and damage awards. He has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed social science journals. He has also authored two book chapters that appeared in Advances in Psychology and Law: Volume 2 (2016) and The Psychology of Juries (2017). Dr. Devine wrote – Jury Decision Making: The State of the Science (2012) – a book published by New York University Press that summarizes the scientific literature on juries and offers an integrative theory of how they reach decisions.
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Alerts and Updates

Data-Driven Case Valuation

Parties to lawsuits and their
lawyers inevitably find themselves pondering one overriding question: What is our case really worth?

Dr. Devine’s Findings Cited in Recent Supreme Court Decision

Link to CNN Article: https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/20/politics/scotus-jury-verdict-criminal-trial/index.htmlLink to judicial opinion:https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/19pdf/18-5924_n6io.pdf The U.S. Supreme Court recently cited research conducted by a ThemeVision team member in their Ramos v. Louisiana decision. The Supreme Court’s decision cited a comprehensive review of jury decision making studies authored by Dennis Devine. The review article was published in a top social science journal … more »

Can You Ever Know Too Much About Prospective Jurors? Cognitive Science Says “Yes”

Trial lawyers often must make inferences about prospective jurors based on precious little information. Courts’ standard juror questionnaires typically include only a few questions. Courts seldom allow parties to use longer, supplemental juror questionnaires that can provide more useful information. Time allocated to questioning prospective jurors in court is limited, and many federal judges no longer allow attorney-conducted voir dire. Some prospective jurors may even skate through the voir dire process without ever saying a word.

Get to know the team

Dennis P. Stolle, JD, PhD

Trisha Volpe, JD

Amit Patel, JD, MA

Keith Slyter

David C. Bartholomew