COVID-19 | Taking it Online: Jury Research in the Age of COVID-19
Learn More

Blog

Filter by:
Preparing for trial during a pandemic: ThemeVision is here to help you develop winning case strategies – remotely. COVID-19 has put some cases and trials on hold, but that means now is the time to get ready for the rush when court calendars are back on track. ThemeVision is a full service litigation consulting firm now offering all of our services via video conference. Learn what mock jurors think about your case, develop case themes and trial communication strategies or prepare your witnesses to testify – all remotely. Read this article to learn more about our remote consulting services to help you gain insight about your case and continue to prepare for trial, mediation or any dispute.
May 2020 As litigation and legal counseling become increasingly global, visuals become increasingly important for overcoming language barriers. When facing language barriers with clients or decision makers, visuals can provide clarity and avoid confusion. Visual aids (pictures, graphs, charts, etc.) can help you construct an effective bridge to your listeners. On a recent trip to … more »
With regard to legal writing, pleadings and briefs are among the first impressions you can make on a judge. Consider anecdotal evidence from Justice Antonin Scalia: “If [I] see someone who has written a sloppy brief, I’m inclined to think that person is a sloppy thinker. It is rare that a person thinks clearly, precisely, carefully, and does not write that way. Contrariwise, it’s rare that someone who is careful and precise in his thought is sloppy in his writing. So it hurts you … to have ungrammatical, sloppy briefs.” Thus, clean, precise, and well-constructed sentences and citations can correlate to sound legal arguments, but have the opposite effect with poorly constructed writing. On a larger scale, a positive first impression made via an initial pleading can parlay into elevated judgments of subsequent filings, and your case as a whole.
Trial lawyers often must make inferences about prospective jurors based on precious little information. Courts’ standard juror questionnaires typically include only a few questions. Courts seldom allow parties to use longer, supplemental juror questionnaires that can provide more useful information. Time allocated to questioning prospective jurors in court is limited, and many federal judges no longer allow attorney-conducted voir dire. Some prospective jurors may even skate through the voir dire process without ever saying a word.